Box Vox

packaging as content

October 26, 2012

26 Brands

For our last day of calendar-dictated content (October 26th) we have twenty-six “26” logos.

1. Above is a logo by Carlos Segura for the T26 Digital Type Foundry that he founded in 1994. As with several other logos in this round-up, the “26″ refers to the number of letters in the (Western Latin) alphabet. (See also: 3, 4, 5)

2. On right is another “T26” logo. Here, however, the logo is for a 26 foot Tanzer sailboat.

3. Michiel van der Born’s logo for his “Twenty-Six Characters” website is below…

4. Below left is Rebecca Neimark’s logo for Twenty-Six Letters, a graphic design studio, specializing in book covers.

5. Above, right is the logo for Brian Jaramillo’s Agency 26.

6. Below left is Danny Skinz’s logo for “Movement 26” an artist collective.

7. Above right is a similar maze-like treatment of the number “26” which is part of the logo for Stable 26—a sock manufacturer named for the number of bones in the human foot. (Packaging and logo, below)

8. Some logos for a numerical company name will use all or part of the number as a superscript. Below left, the logo for Fine 26 (a maker of “great metal based consumer products”) is like that…

9. twenty6 (a business communications and marketing consulting firm) also has a logo that uses a superscript. (above, right) This logo also divides the number into two parts, spelling out “twenty” but using a numeral for “6.” The two logos that follow also do this…

10. Twenty6 Products makes aluminum mountain bike components. (An example of their packaging appears below)

11. Below left, is the logo used online magazine, Twenty6

12. Above right is a logo by Thomas Fethers, also for a Twenty-Six Magazine.

13. Below: Lauren Li Porter’s masthead for her blog, Twenty Six. (our only cursive example) Why twenty-six? Twenty six is my lucky number as well as being my Birthday, and these two facts are not completely unrelated.”

(13 more “26” brands, after the fold…)

14. Some brands also divide the number into two parts but, use numerals for the “20” and spell out the “six.” The clothing brand “20Six Fresh” (below left) does it that way, as does the next example…

15. Above right is logo for interior design firm, 20six. While they never quite explain the reason behind their numeric name, their website offers a number of facts about the number 26…

… the number of human bones in the human foot (see also #7)

… the atomic number of Iron

… the number of Oscars won by Walt Disney

16. The number is all spelled out in the logo for clothing brand “Twenty6ix” except that the “S” in “SIX” has been replaced with a “6.” (As near as I can tell, they were so named because they were founded in 2006.)

 

17. Last up in the mixing of letters and numerals, is Quintin Cooke’s “2wenty6” logo, above, spelled out in the middle, with numerals at either end.

18. The logo above is from makeup artist, Pamela Currie’s website. Twenty-six is the name of her company and her age.

19. Christy Johnson named her company, redshoes26 design. “The 26 came in because I’ve been obsessed with that number since my sophomore year of high school. I got pulled up to the varsity softball team that year, and 26 was the only varsity jersey still available… Now I can’t imagine playing without the number 26 on my back.” The “red shoes” part is another story. (See also: La 25)

20. Two more logos that encircle the number 26… below left is the logo for the German bicycle team: Team Twenty.Six

“… the first German team and the youngest team to ever win the Race Across America…  Team Twenty-six, a team of four young men whose average age is—you guessed it—26 years.”

 

21. Above right is Design Rangers’s logo for TwentySix, “a program that helps children with autism learn to express themselves, imagines the number of letters in the alphabet as an infinity symbol to represent the power of communication.” Note that logo is also an ambigram.

22. A very similar ambigram occurs in the clothing company Division 26’s logo, below left. Here, the “6” is not so legible, looking perilously close to a “7.” (in my opinion)

23. Octavian Budai’s angular Twentysix logo (for “personal ID”) is also close to being an ambigram.

24. Below is a photo of a “Hiking26” logo. Hiking 26 is Ron Ulrich’s photo-documented performance project to hike the Pacific Crest Trail, from April through October, 2012. 26 weeks, hiking 2600 miles, while wearing 26 wedding gowns.

25. Below: Claude Luethi’s devilish logo for “TwentySix” a Swiss streetwear brand.

26. Above: Skyline Media Group’s logo design for “Immune 26” an egg-based health supplement made from the eggs of hens stimulated with over 26 inactivated pathogens.

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